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March 27, 2017

10 frequently asked questions about traumatic brain injury

\Suffering from a traumatic brain injury (TBI) can impact your entire life. Depending on the cause of the accident, you might opt to seek compensation. It is imperative that you understand some basic points about TBIs if you are involved in any accident.

#1: Who is most likely to suffer a TBI?

Elderly people who are at least 75 years old, newborns, toddlers up to four years old, and young adults who are 15 to 24 years old are the most likely populations to suffer from a TBI. Males are more likely to suffer from a TBI than females.

#2: What are some causes of TBIs?

Motor vehicle accidents, falls and sports injuries are some causes of TBIs. Essentially, anything that can result in a hit to the head or a violent jarring motion of the head can lead to this injury.

#3: What are some common symptoms of a TBI?

Headache, vomiting, nausea, loss of consciousness and confusion are common symptoms of TBIs. Dizziness, trouble concentrating, difficulty sleeping, changes in speech and changes in eating patterns might also occur after a TBI.

#4: Do TBI symptoms occur right away?

Not all TBI symptoms occur immediately after the accident. Some effects might not become apparent until hours or days after the accident.

#5: Do I have to hit my head to suffer a TBI?

You don’t have to suffer a direct hit to the head to end up with a TBI. Anything that causes your head to become jarred or to move in a violent manner can cause a TBI. Shaken baby syndrome, which doesn’t involve a hit the head, is a form of TBI.

#6: Are all TBIs serious?

TBIs can range from minor to life-threatening. The area of the brain that is injured, the type of injury, and the effects of the injury determine if the TBI is mild, moderate or severe.

#7: How are TBIs diagnosed?

Doctors use information about the accident, diagnostic imaging scans and physical examinations to diagnose TBIs. Surgical procedures might be necessary to get an accurate diagnosis.

#8: How is TBI severity gauged?

The Glasgow coma scale determines the severity of the TBI. Medical professionals evaluate the patient based on a pre-set series of observations. The score is added up and the result determines the severity of the injury. Lower scores equal a more serious TBI and a worse prognosis.

#9: What are some treatments for TBIs?

The effects, location and type of TBI determine the treatment. When contusions are present, surgical intervention is common. Medication management, rehabilitative care and close monitoring are common after a TBI.

#10: How long will a TBI affect me?

The effects of a TBI can last for the remainder of your life. Even if you have some relief from the symptoms, they can come back or worsen with age. For example, a person who suffers multiple concussions might have cumulative health effects of those concussions.

Attorney Peter M. Goldberg is the founder of and managing partner at Goldberg & Weigand, LLP, and has been in private practice since 1986. He takes pride in the fact he deals directly with his clients on a daily basis working to get their cases resolved to the fullest extent of their rights. Peter practices personal injury law and workers compensation law in Massachusetts.

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